Julianne’s Favorites


 

“One final paragraph of advice: Do not burn yourselves out. Be as I am–a reluctant crusader, a half-hearted fanatic. Save the other half of yourselves and your lives for pleasure and adventure. It is not enough to fight for the land; it is even more important to enjoy it. While you can. While it’s still there. So get out there and hunt and fish and mess around with your friends, ramble out yonder and explore the forests, encounter the grizz, climb the mountains, bag the peaks, run the rivers, breathe deep of that yet sweet and lucid air, sit quietly for a while and contemplate the precious stillness, that lovely, mysterious and awesome space. Enjoy yourselves, keep your brain in your head and your head firmly attached to the body, the body active and alive, and I promise you this much: I promise you this one sweet victory over our enemies, ever those desk bound people with their hearts in a safe deposit box and their eyes hypnotized by desk calculators. I promise you this: you will outlive the bastards.”

– Edward Abbey

 


 

 

“People need wild places. Whether or not we think we do, we do. We need to be able to taste grace and know once again that we desire it. We need to experience a landscape that is timeless, whose agenda moves at a pace of [speciation and] glaciers. To be surrounded by a singing, mating, howling commotion of other species, all of which love their lives as much as we do ours; and none of which could possibly care less about our economic status or our running day calendar. Wildness puts us in our place. It reminds us that our own plans are small and somewhat absurd. It reminds us why, in those cases in which our plans might influence many future generations, we ought to choose carefully. Looking out on a clean plank of planet earth, we can get shaken right down to the bone by the bronze-eyed possibility of lives that are not our own”

– Barbara Kingsolver “Knowing Our Place” found in: Small Wonder: Essays (NY, Harper Collins Press 2002)

 


 

 

“To an uncomfortable degree, we are what we touch and are touched by. We must think carefully about what we destroy, what we preserve, and what we choose to reclaim. To survive with some grace and sanity, I believe we must learn how to live more lovingly on the land, encouraging the natural diversity that sustains us.”

– Annick Smith

 


 

 

“I am in love with this world. I have nestled lovingly in it. I have climbed its mountains, roamed its forests, sailed its waters, crossed its deserts, felt the sting of its frosts, the oppression of its heats, the drench of its rains, the fury of its winds, and always have beauty and joy waited upon my goings and comings.”

– John Burroughs