Waiting for the Snow

Foreboding sky
Dark and gray
Still and calm
Is the day

You can feel it
In your bones
Winter is coming
The old world groans

You can smell it
In the air
Soon to cover
Trees so bare

Dry air charged
Static electricity
Sparks and giggles
Bring such felicity

Birds gather
Then take flight
Visions of which
Make senses excite

The first snowflake
Drifts to earth
Bringing with it
Peals of mirth

A white Christmas
Soon to be
Snow on ground
And every tree

By Ann Christine Tabaka

child at window watching for snow


Tabaka Author PhotoAnn Christine Tabaka was born and lives in Delaware. She is a published poet, an artist, a chemist, and a personal trainer. She loves gardening, cooking, and the ocean. Chris lives with her husband and two cats. Her poems have been published in numerous national and international poetry journals, reviews, and anthologies. Chris has been selected as the resident Haiku poet for Stanzaic Stylings.

Photo of child watching out window by Evgeny Atamanenko

Winter

Howling winds
  Briskly blow
With winter time
  Comes the snow
Rosy cheeks
  Are all aglow

Diamond dust
  From the sky
Dancing glitter
  From on high
Soaring clouds
  Go drifting by

Glowing sun
  On snow so white
Shimmering crystals
  Reflecting light
Glistening ice cycles
  Sparkling bright

By Ann Christine Tabaka

winter trees in mountains covered with fresh snow


Tabaka Author PhotoAnn Christine Tabaka was born and lives in Delaware. She is a published poet, an artist, a chemist, and a personal trainer. She loves gardening, cooking, and the ocean. Chris lives with her husband and two cats. Her poems have been published in numerous national and international poetry journals, reviews, and anthologies. Chris has been selected as the resident Haiku poet for Stanzaic Stylings.

Photo of snowy mountain forest by Leon Tit

Old Sparrow and Snow

Ruffled feathers worn
from a lifetime
of winters.

His last snowfall
spent perched
on cedar branches.

By Catori Sarmiento

snow and sparrow on branches


After growing up in the Pacific Northwest, Catori Sarmiento’s world travels have often inspired her unique writing style. When not exploring the many cracks and crags in Japan, Catori Sarmiento spends her time writing poetry and prose. As an author, her works have appeared in numerous literary publications. Visit her at www.catorisarmiento.com

Photo of sparrow by divedog

First Snow

1
we watch
for the first
snowfall
wait for
silent passage
along the banks of
the ancient creek

2
dull morning light
conceals
golden Gingko leaves
beneath
new-fallen snow

By Lynda Lambert


Lynda Lambert Author PhotoLynda McKinney Lambert lives in the rural Village of Wurtemburg in western Pennsylvania. She writes poetry and creative non-fiction essays. She retired from teaching as professor of fine arts and humanities at Geneva College, Beaver Falls, Pennsylvannia, USA. Lambert’s first book, Concerti: Psalms for the Pilgrimage was published by Kota Press. Her work appears in Spirit Fire Review; Indiana Voice Journal; Magnets & Ladders; Stylist; Breath & Shadow; Wordgathering; The Avocet; Proverse Hong Kong; Behind our Eyes: A Second Look – Anthology; and other literary journals and anthologies. She is also an actively exhibiting fiber artist. Major themes in her creative works are Nature; Mythology; Art and History.

Lynda McKinney lost most of her sight in 2007 due to Ischemic Optic Neuropathy. She creates her art work and writing projects via the use of technologies for the blind.

Visit her Blog: www.lyndalambert.com
View her Author’s Page: www.dldbooks.com/lyndalambert
Contact her: riverwoman@zoominternet.net

Photo of leaves in snow by Sergey Filonenko

Marie Creek

Smallest of flames — a spark.
Globs of white crystallized water
cling to spruce needles before
bowing to pressure in the only
direction worth mentioning.
Imagine…
Perception precedes
existence, or not.
Next to something peaceful,
at least.

By Brandon Earl MacLeod

snow covered creek and trees


Brandon Earl MacLeod is a poet, photographer, and teacher from Cold Lake, Alberta, Canada. He resides in North Spirit Lake, Ontario where he taught journalism with Journalists for Human Rights’ Indigenous Reporters Program and now works with students primarily on literacy and humanities. Born in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Brandon is of Métis heritage and looks up to his Auntie Connie, a watercolour artist, for inspiration. Spending time outdoors has been something of a healing process and place of discovery and his poem Marie Creek was written among the trees and creeks in the forests of northern Alberta. Much of Brandon’s poetry is written about and while surrounded by the natural world and is available, along with his selected photos and published works, at brandomaclo.tumblr.com.

Photo of snowy creek by Wildman