Winter Storm: Two Poems

More Snow

Overcast January morning
Flurries at dawn
Anticipated forecast
One to two inches

Driveway, sidewalk covered
Shoveled off porch and steps
Footprints quickly vanished
Three to four inches

Snowfall intensified
Like a down feather pillow fight
Limited visibility
Five to six inches

Laden branches bent
Under the weight
Tree limbs moaned
Seven to eight inches

Fallen tree limbs
Power outages
Temperatures plummeted
Nine to ten inches

Snow accumulated
Exceeded expectations
Sculpted landscape,
Frozen beauty

By Suzanne Cottrell

 

Wintry S’mores

Ice flecks sparkle in snow covered yard
Decorated by animal tracks,
Protruding wild grasses, shifting shadows

Half hidden nuts resemble chocolate chips
Marshmallow, snow-capped fence posts
Protrude from graham cracker soil
Savor winter’s dessert

By Suzanne Cottrell

snowcovered trees and fence


Suzanne Cottrell, an Ohio buckeye by birth, lives with her husband and three rescue dogs in rural Piedmont North Carolina. An outdoor enthusiast and retired teacher, she enjoys hiking, biking, gardening, and Pilates. She loves nature and its sensory stimuli and particularly enjoys writing and experimenting with poetry and flash fiction. Her poetry has appeared in numerous online and print journals including North Carolina’s Best Emerging Poets: An Anthology, The Avocet, The Remembered Arts Journal, Plum Tree Tavern, Haiku Journal, Cagibi Literary, and Poetry Quarterly.

Photo by the author

Glacial Ecstasy

Standing on cruise ship’s deck
Icy waters of Glacier Bay, Alaska
Lapping against bow

Crystalline, turquoise ice sheets
Towering along irregular shoreline
Pushes, shifts, carves terrain

Moans, crackles
Anticipation mounts
Thundering, spontaneous crashes

Ice chunks plunge
Detonate, spew
Jets of sea spray

Bobbing icebergs
Dangerous mass submerged
Waves ripple, intensify

Standing on cruise ship’s deck
Icy waters of Glacier Bay, Alaska
Mesmerized by calving glaciers

By Suzanne Cottrell

Hubbard glacier in Alaska under cloudy skies


Suzanne Cottrell, an Ohio buckeye by birth, lives with her husband and three rescue dogs in rural Piedmont North Carolina. An outdoor enthusiast and retired teacher, she enjoys hiking, biking, gardening, and Pilates. She loves nature and its sensory stimuli and particularly enjoys writing and experimenting with poetry and flash fiction. Her poetry has appeared in numerous online and print journals including North Carolina’s Best Emerging Poets: An Anthology, The Avocet, The Remembered Arts Journal, Plum Tree Tavern, Haiku Journal, Cagibi Literary, and Poetry Quarterly.

Photo of Hubbard Glacier in Alaska by Darryl Brooks

Masterful Sculpture

Chocolate, yellow cake batter dollops
Knife drawn zig zags, marble cake
Mother Nature’s marbled canyon recipe
“The Wave” in North Coyote Buttes, Arizona
Manipulated water, dry winds
Constructed U-shaped troughs
Run-off painted manganese and iron
Stretched streaks of color through
Thin horizontal and vertical layers of Navajo sandstone
Like pulling bands of salt water taffy
Liesegang rings, burnt orange, cinnamon,
Umber, ochre, white, and green swirls
Winds carried sand etched the desert rock face
Rock wrens, cliff swallows nested in fissures
Chuckwalla lizard scurried across heated rock
Stagnant, sedentary undulations
Ridges as fragile as tri-colored ribbon candy
Transformed over time

By Suzanne Cottrell

red and orange sandstone formation


Suzanne Cottrell, an Ohio Buckeye by birth, lives with her husband and three rescue dogs in rural Piedmont North Carolina. An outdoor enthusiast and retired teacher, she enjoys hiking, biking, gardening, and Pilates. She loves nature and its sensory stimuli and particularly enjoys writing and experimenting with poetry and flash fiction. Her work has appeared in The Avocet, The Weekly Avocet, The Remembered Arts Journal, Plum Tree Tavern, The Skinny Poetry Journal, Three Line Poetry, Haiku Journal, Tanka Journal, Poetry Quarterly, Women’s Voices Anthology (These Fragile Lilacs Literary Journal), The Pop Machine (Inwood Indiana Press), and Nailpolish Stories, A Tiny and Colorful Literary Journal.

Photo of The Wave, North Coyote Buttes, Arizona, US, by kojoty.

Remnants

Ponderosa pine and Juniper shroud
Jemez Mountains of New Mexico
Vestiges of ancient volcanic eruption

Rito de los Frijoles, Bean Creek,
Meanders on the canyon floor
Once lined by garden plots
Maize, beans, and squash

Now displaced by prickly pear and cholla cacti
Zone-tailed hawk soars overhead
Rutting elk bugle shrills pierce the silence

Ancestral chants ride on arid winds
Between towering sandstone canyon walls
Ancient ones, a colony of worker bees

Constructed stacked adobe pueblos
Honeycomb ruins tucked within red rock caves
Cliff-side dwellings accessible by
Propped wooden ladders

Masterful sandstone masonry
Once disguised by mud plaster,
Now revealed

By Suzanne Cottrell

Pueblo ruins in New Mexico


Suzanne Cottrell, an Ohio Buckeye by birth, lives with her husband and three rescue dogs in rural Piedmont North Carolina. An outdoor enthusiast and retired teacher, she enjoys hiking, biking, gardening, and Pilates. She loves nature and its sensory stimuli and particularly enjoys writing and experimenting with poetry and flash fiction. Her work has appeared in The Avocet, The Weekly Avocet, The Remembered Arts Journal, Plum Tree Tavern, The Skinny Poetry Journal, Three Line Poetry, Haiku Journal, Tanka Journal, Poetry Quarterly, Women’s Voices Anthology (These Fragile Lilacs Literary Journal), The Pop Machine (Inwood Indiana Press), and Nailpolish Stories, A Tiny and Colorful Literary Journal.

Photo of Pueblo Ruins in Bandelier National Monument, New Mexico by William Silver.

Pretentious Flair

Sturdy stalks emanate among
Sword-shaped leaves
Ascending to five feet,
Dwarfing surrounding plants

Spires topped with tubular florets
Blazing, ombre torches of
Reddish-orange, coral, and canary blooms
Torch lilies, red hot poker plants, Kniphofia

Usher butterflies, bees, hummingbirds
To their safe harbor and delectable nectar
A flower bed’s ostentatious focal point
Dominating from spring to fall

By Suzanne Cottrell

torch lily plant in garden
A mysterious plant appeared in one of our raised flower beds, perhaps a seed gift delivered by a bird. Calling upon my father’s gardening knowledge, I learned that it was a Kniphofia, better known as a torch lily or red hot poker plant. It continues to be the show stopper of our flower bed.


photo of authorSuzanne Cottrell, an Ohio Buckeye by birth, lives with her husband and three rescue dogs in rural Piedmont North Carolina. An outdoor enthusiast and retired teacher, she enjoys hiking, biking, gardening, and Pilates. She loves nature and its sensory stimuli and particularly enjoys writing and experimenting with poetry and flash fiction. Her work has appeared in The Avocet, The Weekly Avocet, The Remembered Arts Journal, Plum Tree Tavern, The Skinny Poetry Journal, Three Line Poetry, Haiku Journal, Tanka Journal, Poetry Quarterly, Women’s Voices Anthology (These Fragile Lilacs Literary Journal), The Pop Machine (Inwood Indiana Press), and Nailpolish Stories, A Tiny and Colorful Literary Journal.